A Taste Of Napa

This Saturday I had the opportunity to go to Napa for a small private event. We met at Oxbow Market in downtown Napa. Oxbow District of Napa has become the local gathering place for great food and wine in downtown Napa and throughout the Napa Valley. The goal is to create an atmosphere within the Oxbow Public Market to improve the local food culture through education, community outreach and support of local businesses and farms.

 

Gemstone Vineyard

From Oxbow, we drove to our first destination Gemstone Vineyard. The vineyard farm 20 micro-blocks within their 16-acre estate to optimize the uniqueness of their diverse soils and numerous clonal selections. When Thomas Rivers Brown joined Gemstone in 2007, he immediately understood that the estate could support three stylistically distinct expressions of Cabernet Sauvignon.

While sitting outside under the trees, having a very delicious lunch, we were fortunate to taste wines they only had very few left of. And I understand why. To be honest, I'm not a wine person, I don't know much about wine, I'm the kind of person you would not pick to choose the wine. Okay, now you know - but I could tell that these wines are not something you get every day. 

 

Sinegal Estate Winery

Sinegal Estate Winery is one of the oldest vineyards in Napa. It is historically know as The Inglewood Estate, with 30-acres with perfect soil, subtle microclimates and varied terrain.

The first vines was planted back in 1881, by Alton Williams, and 4 years later they harvested for the first time. 130 years later, Sinegal Estate will release its first wine. The Estate has a diverse selection of varietals: Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, Malbec, Petit Verdot, Sauvignon Blanc, Sauvignon Masque, and Semilion.

The Estate is magnificent. It’s modern with a classic, warm European style. Everything is clean, from the design of the tasting room, the labels on the bottles, to the barrels. For me, and my self-diagnosed OCD, a true pleasure to the eye.

Beth welcomed us and showed us everything. How they sort the grapes, where the store the wine and for how long. The French oak barrels, and made sure we tasted a good selection of their wines. Sinegal produces 3000 cases a year. They mainly sell through their membership club, to a few restaurants, so not easy to get a hold of their wines. Again these wines were something more than every day wine.